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Vote by Mail

All New Yorkers can vote by mail this fall

The absentee ballot request deadline is October 27th. Request your ballot NOW.

There are several ways to request your ballot:

  • Online at nycabsentee.com
  • Email request form to Apply4Absentee@boe.nyc (PDF of completed, signed request form)
  • Mail request form to your local borough office
  • Call 1-866-VOTE-NYC (1-866-868-3692)
  • Fax request form to 212-487-5349

If you are visually impaired or have a disability, you may request an accessible absentee ballot that can be read by a screen reader at nycabsentee.com/accessibility.

Track your ballot: nycabsentee.com/tracking

How to Vote by Mail

What reason should I select on my ballot request form?
You can choose “Temporary illness or disability,” which includes the risk of contracting the coronavirus.

Am I still eligible to vote in person if I request a ballot?
Yes! You can still vote early in person (October 24th-November 1st) or on Election Day if you request a ballot. Your early voting site may be different from your Election Day poll site, so make sure to check before you go. You can find your poll sites at findmypollsite.vote.nyc.

I’m worried about the mail. Can I drop off my ballot after I receive it?
Yes! You can drop off your ballot at any NYC Early Voting site, Election Day poll site, or Board of Elections office. Ballot boxes will be located inside at the front desk in every location.

Someone else’s name is listed on the envelope for my absentee ballot. What do I do?
DO NOT return your ballot in an envelope with someone else’s name listed. All affected voters will be notified by the Board of Elections and will receive corrected absentee ballots and ballot envelopes beginning the week of 10/5.You can either vote with your corrected ballot and ballot envelope or vote in-person (Early Voting or Election Day). You can contact the Board of Elections at 1-866-VOTE-NYC or Apply4Absentee@boe.nyc to request a replacement, if you don’t receive one automatically.

I’m not sure if I received the wrong ballot envelope. What do I do?
Your absentee ballot envelope will look like this. Make sure to check the bottom left corner. (This name and address has been removed for privacy.) The Board of Elections is also planning on contacting all voters who received a faulty ballot envelope by mail, email, or phone.

My ballot says “Official Absentee Military Ballot,” but I’m not in the military. What do I do?
This is the correct ballot, even if you are not serving in the military. Typically, there is a slash between the words “Absentee / Military” like on the primary ballots from this June. The slash was not included this time. Though confusing, these ballots are still valid.

I received an absentee ballot envelope addressed to my neighbor. Should I bring it to them?
No. The Board of Elections will notify all affected voters and send them corrected absentee ballots and ballot envelopes. But please do continue being a good neighbor!

I’m worried that I submitted my absentee ballot in an envelope with someone else’s name, or that someone else submitted their absentee ballot in an envelope with my name. How will our votes be affected?
Absentee ballots that were submitted in an envelope with someone else’s name will not be counted. Before counting absentee ballots, the Board of Elections confirms that the voter’s signature on the ballot envelope matches BOTH the name printed on the ballot envelope and the signature on file for their voter registration. In addition, the Board of Elections will notify all affected voters and send them corrected absentee ballots and ballot envelopes. You are both still eligible to either vote with those corrected ballots and ballot envelopes or vote in-person.

Do I need to put stamps on my ballot?
Yes, make sure to add postage to the outside of the return envelope before you place it in the mail. We recommend using 2 stamps. The return envelope will list the address of your local Board of Elections office and include a logo that reads, “Official Election Mail.”

You can also drop off your ballot at any Early Voting site, Election Day poll site, or Board of Elections office, which would not require postage.

If I voted by mail during the June primaries, do I still need to request a ballot?
Yes, unless you are already on the permanent absentee voter list due to a long-term disability or illness.

When will absentee ballots be mailed?
The Board of Elections is now mailing out ballots to voters who request them on a rolling basis.

I am currently living abroad. Can I vote by mail?
Yes! You can find more information from the Federal Voting Assistance Program at www.fvap.gov.

Print-at-Home Absentee Ballot Request Form

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Guide to the Absentee Ballot Request Form

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You must submit your completed absentee ballot request to your borough’s Board of Elections by October 27, but we encourage you to request your ballot as soon as possible. Mailing addresses are on page 2 of the request form above.

You can also vote by absentee ballot if you are a registered voter and cannot make it to your polling site on Election Day because of your:

  • occupation
  • business
  • studies
  • travel
  • imprisonment (other than a convicted felon)
  • illness, disability, hospitalization, or residence in a long-term care facility

There are two ways to vote by absentee ballot: by mail or in-person.

If you know you will need to vote by absentee ballot, you can download, complete, and submit an absentee ballot application to the BOE office in your borough at least seven days before the election.

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The BOE will mail you a ballot, which you will need to fill out and mail to your local BOE office no later than the day of the election; the BOE must receive it no later than seven days after the election.

You can also hand deliver your absentee ballot application to the BOE office in your borough (no later than the day before the election) and receive your absentee ballot immediately.

In-person absentee voting begins as soon as the ballots are available (at least 32 days before an election) and ends on Election Day. You may vote absentee at the BOE office in your borough Monday through Friday and on the weekend prior to Election Day, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and until 9 p.m. on Election Day.

If the deadline for requesting an absentee ballot by mail has passed and you cannot appear at your poll site on Election Day because of an accident or sudden illness, you may send a representative to your borough office with a written letter of authorization to receive an absentee ballot on your behalf. A completed application and your completed ballot must be returned to the BOE office in your borough by 9:00 p.m. on Election Day.

If you are permanently ill or disabled and cannot get to your poll site, you can vote by absentee ballot on a permanent basis by getting on the New York City Board of Elections permanent absentee ballot list. Check the box marked “permanent illness or physical disability” of the absentee ballot application, and the BOE will automatically send you an absentee ballot application for each election for which you qualify to vote.

Note: Some poll sites are accessible to New Yorkers with disabilities. Voters can find out if their poll sites are accessible for the disabled by calling the voter hotline, 1-866-Vote-NYC. Disabled voters whose poll sites are not accessible can request to vote at the nearest poll site in their district that is accessible.

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